A lovely new review for Wanderer on Read Plus!

We are delighted to see this fabulous review by Carolyn Hull, of Victor Kelleher’s gorgeous novel Wanderer, published today on the excellent Read Plus site.

Here’s a short extract:

I loved this! It is a wonderful adventure in a world that is damaged. Wanderer is a compelling tale, scary and often thought-provoking……This book is powerfully written, there is tension and drama all the way through the wandering, and moments of violence are ever present and pervasive. In some ways I reflected that this book is like a strange mating of the Brotherband series by John Flanagan and Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. It explores the adventure of a quest, with the drama of a world that has lost its connection to literature. Along the way there are references to other ‘stories’ and other books, with a reference to Golding’s Lord of the Flies as a notable connection to the thematic exploration of brutality in society, and The Hobbit as a literature example of a quest to protect something precious. 

You can read the whole review here.

Advertisement

Fabulous first review of Children of the Wild!

Michael Grey’s amazing novel, Children of the Wild, has just received its first review, and it’s fabulous! It’s on the influential book site Read Plus, and the reviewer is Carolyn Hull. Here’s a short extract:

This is an exciting and impressive first novel. There are waves of dramatic moments within a dystopian or speculative-style fantasy set in an unidentified world that has declined beyond imagination. Sometimes it has the feel of a ‘Hunger Games’ survival tale with bows and arrows, set within a world-gone-wrong, and sometimes it is more Sci-fi with coming-of-age overtones.

You can read the full review here.

First review for Charlie Chaplin: The Usual Suspect

Charlie Chaplin: The Usual Suspect, by Phoebe McArthur, has just received its first review, in Read Plus, with the reviewer, Carolyn Hull, recommending the novel. Here’s a short extract:

This book has been written in the style of a Trixie Belden mystery – a young girl who can solve problems and crimes with only the help of other kids. It will appeal to young readers who love a mystery story...

You can read the whole review here.

Great new review of The Girl in the Mirror

There’s a lovely new review of our Davitt Award-winning title, Jenny Blackford’s The Girl in the Mirror, on writer Jonathan Shaw’s blog. Here’s a short extract:

In what seems another lifetime, I was professionally immersed for something like 15 years in literature for children of primary school age – the brilliant range of writing arrayed between little children’s picture books and beginners’ chapter books at one end and YA fiction at the other. I haven’t read a lot of it since. The Girl in the Mirror reminds me of what I’m missing.

You can read the whole review here.

https://shawjonathan.files.wordpress.com/2020/10/girlinthemirror.jpg

First advance review for The Girl in the Mirror!

An excellent first review of our forthcoming title, Jenny Blackford’s The Girl in the Mirror, has just appeared in Buzz Words magazine, here’s a short extract:

There is a mystery to be solved and lives to be saved and an evil force to be overcome. This time-shifting tale hooks the reader into the mystery with its clever storytelling. The reader wants to join the girls in their quest to remove the evil that lurks in the shadows of both their lives. 

You can read the whole review here.

(The Girl in the Mirror‘s official release date is October 8, but you can order it already from your favourite bookshop.)

 

New review of Tomodachi: The Forest of the Night

There’s a nice review of Tomodachi: The Forest of the Night in the latest(March) issue of the prestigious children’s literature magazine Magpies.

The review, which is by Joy Lawn, isn’t available online, but here’s a short extract:

‘…fight scenes are gripping, prolific and told with undeniable authority. They, and issues of difference and how to manage it positively, deftly propel the reader into another place and culture.’

 

First review for Tomodachi: The Forest of the Night!

The first review of Simon Higgins’ gripping novel, Tomodachi: The Forest of the Night, has just come out, and it’s excellent! It’s published in Reading Time. Here’s an excerpt:

Simon Higgins, a former police office and private investigator specializing in murder cases, and one of the world’s best martial artists (in the sword art of Iaido), is as it happens also a novelist of meticulous and respectful detail. His new novel is set in a fanciful historical Japan, and it comes with a long glossary at the end which introduces readers to many terms that are important to Japan’s history, its culture and the popularization of art forms such as Manga and Anime.

You can read the whole thing here.

Two excellent reviews for The Lighthouse at Pelican Rock

The reviews for Stephen Hart’s fabulous novel, just published this month with Eagle Books, have started coming in, and they’re excellent!

Here’s a short extract from a review at Kids’ Book Review:

There are many sub-stories built into a storyline that keeps the reader engaged from beginning to end. Terrific characters, tension, and well-paced progress, added to lots of unexpected turn-offs through the plot, kept me longing to know what the outcome will be. Then came the completely unexpected ending!

And here is a short extract from a review at Read Plus:

Themes such as friendship, family dynamics and mystery are delved into. There are lots of smaller story lines that are interwoven in the story and it is intriguing to try and match them all together. It certainly kept me turning the pages. I would recommend this book for children 11 and up as some of the storyline can be quite complex. A welcome addition to the collection.

Read the reviews in full at the links above.